Odds of Becoming a NBA Basketball Player

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What are the chances of making it to the NBA?

Written by Lamar Hull @ Google+

 

Why do we play basketball? 

Do you want to play in the NBA?

One of the ultimate goals and dreams of millions is to become a NBA basketball player.

A lot of questions young basketball players have about the NBA surrounds the following: can I make it to the NBA, how to make it to the NBA, what are the odds of playing in the NBA, how to become a NBA player, or even how hard is it to make it to the NBA.

If you have asked yourself this question, then this article is for you!

Making it to the NBA takes a lot of consistent hard-work, luck, determination, basketball skill and talent, exposure, and many other things!

A lot of people say they want to become a NBA basketball player, but if there was a blueprint for how to become a NBA basketball player, would you follow that “How to Be a NBA Player” blueprint perfectly?

A lot of us say yes, but would you really?

The basketball players who make it to the NBA are talented, but they truly work their butts off everyday to make it to that level, spending long hours in the gym, perfecting their game.

 

Learn From The Pros!

Here are 7 Training Secrets Proven to Increase In-Game Basketball Performance.

It is not easy making it to the NBA. This article isn’t to discourage anyone, but to present the facts.

I have provided some interesting data, see the chart below. Only 0.03% of high school players make it to the NBA!

The odds of playing in the NBA is super low. I remember when I had the dream of becoming a NBA basketball player.

I spent about 4 hours a week working on my game, at my height, that wasn’t enough.

I was at a disadvantage because I’m only 5’9″, so I believe that I would have needed to practice 6-7 hours a day including the weekends to have any chance of playing in the NBA and there is still no guarantee with that type of work-ethic.

 

chances of making it to the nba

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All NBA players agree that practice is what got them to the NBA. Whatever level that you desire to play in (NBA, overseas, etc.), you have to practice A LOT.

Apart from the talent, NBA players will tell you that they spent a lot of time on the court playing with others or having solitary time to improve their basketball skills.

According to Cedric Henderson of the Memphis grizzlies; he would spend at least 5 hours a day on the court practicing.

He did not have to do it all at once, but he would spread out the hours, in between breaks. He would make around 700 shots a day.

Jerry Dupree, a former USC forward spent at least three hours each day in the gym during the week.

One of my favorite basketball quotes was stated by Jason Kidd, “A lot of late nights in the gym, a lot of early mornings, especially when your friends are going out, you’re going to the gym, those are the sacrifices that you have to make if you want to be an NBA basketball player”. He couldn’t have said it any better!

Practice…Practice…Practice

For some NBA players, they would spend most of their free time in the gym in order to get away from the world.

Basketball was there way of escaping all of the issues that surrounded them and was a way that allowed them to devote their energy in a controlled environment.

A NBA player’s typical day consists of school, basketball and more basketball. This includes players such as Michael Jordan, who is the best basketball player ever.

There is no question that a lot of time has to be spent to perfect the skill from early on; and many professionals have lived by this virtue.

Before the NBA

odds of making it to the nba

Before you start dreaming about what suit you are going to wear when you get drafted to the NBA, you need to play basketball at the collegiate level.

Players get drafted to the NBA once a year.

In the past, it was possible for high school players to be drafted.

However, since 2006 the rules for drafting have changed. Nowadays, college and international players are typically the ones being drafted to the NBA.

U.S. players now have to play one year in college before declaring for the NBA draft. Once you are recruited and land a position with your favorite collegiate program, you need to be a standout basketball player.

Guess what will help you to do that? P-R-A-C-T-I-C-E. Don’t think you can make it just off of talent alone because there are tons of players who have raw talent. AND don’t have the Allen Iverson practice syndrome, “Practice…You talking about Practice!?”.

Before you get the opportunity to play in college, you need to be a standout high school player. This also includes getting exposure at developmental camps, AAU tournaments, and etc.

Some of the notable players that you can do some research on that were drafted or recruited as high school seniors include the following. This will give you an idea of what skills, talent, persistence, dedication, and work-ethic that you will need to posses to go to the NBA after your first year playing college basketball.

Notable High School Players who were Drafted to the NBA:

1995 – Kevin Garnett (Minnesota Timberwolves), Farragut Academy

1996 – Kobe Bryant (Charlotte Hornets), Lower Merion High School

2003 – Lebron James (Cleveland Cavaliers), St. Vincent-St. Mary

2004 – Dwight Howard (Orlando Magic), Southwest Atlanta Christian Academy

Some of the international players drafted include the following players:

2002 – Yao Ming (Houston Rockets), China

2005 – Andrew Bogut (Milwaukee Bucks), Australia

2006 – Andrea Bargani (Toronto Raptors), Italy

2013 – Anthony Bennet (Cleveland Cavaliers), Canada

2014 – Anthony Wiggins (Cleveland Cavaliers), Canada

 

How NBA players perform in High School and College

It is super important to have good grades, especially in high school. One of my family members, will not say any names had some big time basketball programs recruiting him.

He played around in class and didn’t take his academics seriously and he wasn’t able to attend any of those programs. The better your grades are, the less pressure you have on the SAT or ACT.

You still want do your best on those exams! Your academics are super important in high school and college.

In college, you may not get drafted or want to pursue a basketball career after college, so you want to set yourself up for the business world.

Interestingly, a lot of NBA players are average to below average in terms of academic performance. But for some players, they are able to strike a balance and are able to stand out in the academic world.

There is a need for you to be disciplined in your academics, so that you can have a future after basketball.

Recently, basketball in the NBA has started associating itself with excellence and promoting good academic performance in sports.

Performing on the court is super important as well. NBA players are typically dominate in high school! Check out this highlight reel of Kobe, Lebron James, Derrick Rose, and Kevin Durant in high school.

Highlight Video of NBA Players in High School

 

Some of the notable top academic performers in the NBA include the following players:

Brandon Knight – He was a straight A student in high school

Grant Hill – He was his high school’s Valedictorian

Mark Pope – He wanted to go to Med school before joining the NBA

Chris Bosh – He was a member of the National Honor Society and graduated with Honors

Thaddeus Young – Had a 4.0 GPA at Georgia Tech

Danny Granger – He was accepted to several Ivy League universities




average nba height

Most people associate basketball with tall people. I remember my peers at a young age telling me that I couldn’t be successful at basketball because I was too short.

The average height of a NBA player is 6 feet and 7.62 inches. Don’t let that discourage you if you are not super tall.

If you work hard and get the right opportunity, the skies are the limit. Height alone doesn’t guarantee anyone a spot in the NBA.

Talent, work-ethic, and drive will take you a long way. Some of the research done indicates that the following is the average height of a NBA players by position.

Average NBA Height by Position:

Center – 7 feet 0 inches

Power Forward – 6 feet 10 inches

Small Forward – 6 feet 8 inches

Shooting Guard – 6 feet 6 inches

Point Guard – 6 feet 2 inches

 

AAU SPOTLIGHT

Some of the most successful basketball players in the NBA played AAU. The main purpose of AAU is to promote and develop the talent of amateur basketball players.

Some of the players who participated in AAU basketball includes the following; Shaquille O’Neal, Carmelo Anthony, Paul pierce, Kevin Garnett, Lebron James, Baron Davis, Patrick Ewing, and plenty others.

There are others who opted to participate in some of the top basketball camps to get more exposure from college and NBA coaches.

This might be an expensive venture but it has proven to be quite fruitful. The NBA is made up of 45% of players who participated in some type of basketball exposure camp.

 

conclusion

Have you ever wonder how to become a NBA player? I think all basketball players want the answer to that question! Guess what? There is no blueprint, you will have to create a way for yourself.  

You need to be working on your game everyday, spending long hours in the gym. Working on your fundamentals is super important! This will help you develop your basketball IQ and your ability to adjust and perform in any basketball game.

One important thing to note, you could work on your game everyday and still not make it to the NBA, but you could set yourself up for a healthy basketball career overseas, in the D-League, and etc.

You can’t be drafted to the NBA straight out of college as the rules have changed. To be drafted to the NBA, you must have completed high school and spent at least 1 year playing collegiate basketball.

You also must be at least 19 years old before considering the NBA. A lot of young basketball players dream of making it to the NBA, only a select few are chosen each year, will you prepare your self everyday in hopes of making that dream come true?

I wish I would have had these facts a long time ago, if I did, would I have worked harder?

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Odds of Becoming a NBA Basketball Player by

155 Responses to “Odds of Becoming a NBA Basketball Player”

  1. Drake

    I think that those percentage statistics are real, but I don’t think they are inspirational. I think that the REAL statistics are 50/50. Either, you put in the most amount of hard-work that you can give, or you just say “I want to be a Basketball player, but I don’t want to have to put in the effort”. My friend and I are training ourselves to the maximum of our ability to get into the NBA, or at least close to it, and we aren’t going to give up just because of those bullshit chances.
    It’s simple, either you do, or you don’t.
    Those are the REAL statistics.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Drake – thanks for responding! The statistics are definitely reality which is okay! A few players defy the odds of becoming an NBA basketball player by working hard on their game everyday, getting exposure at the right camps, focusing on their academics, and etc. Man don’t ever give up, this isn’t what this article is for, i had the dream of playing in the NBA and worked my butt off. Had the opportunity to play collegiate and professionally overseas! The purpose of this article is to simply provide the facts, but read the questions at the very end of the article. This will give you a better sense of the purpose of this article.

      Reply
  2. Dawn

    My son aged 15 is determined to get into the NBA and has a professional Coach, plays way above his age level and is continuing to play in leagues that challenge him (gone are the days of playing at the YMCA and him being the best player!). He spends all of his time either playing basketball, reading about basketball, watching YouTube videos on Basketball, Watching all levels of basketball on the tv channel (we have to pay for!) And on top of that he spends about 8 hours a day either playing basketball in pick up games with kids older than him or at the club he belongs to where his professional Coach is. He can only do this because he’s unschooled and grades and memorizing information is not something that is going to help him get to the NBA. I watch some of the kids over the years who are really, really good and would love to get to the NBA but they don’t have the parental support. My husband coached my son for about 5 years and put teams together around my son. Then it was time to move onto professional coaching and that’s what we pay for. I’d rather give it to a professional basketball coach than buy pencils for a school. Anyway enough ranting… thanks for the great information.

    Reply
    • Just a guy

      I understand what your saying but say basketball doesn’t work for your son due to injury, loss of love for the game, or just a bad situation, now he has no education and back up plan and life will be extremely difficult please don’t post anti educational things on the internet because I would hate to see a dream missed and life turned much more difficult than necessary due to immaturity of parents. I highly suggest you put your kid in school.

      Reply
    • Leopold

      It’s extremely reckless and dumb of you to disregard his education, because if he doesn’t make it to professional basketball, you’ve managed to destroy any other type of future because you couldn’t “buy him pencils” or keep him in school. It’s disgusting for you to say others don’t have the right parental support when you’ve potentially destroyed any other chance for him to have a career in anything but basketball. That is what you call bad parental support. Well maybe thanks to you he can have the great opportunity of sleeping in the streets or have to clean the streets as his only mean of income. Well done.

      Reply
      • LeBron James Wisdom

        I agree with Leopold, WHAT THE HECK ARE YOU THINKING NOT EDUCATING YOUR CHILD!? To make it to the NBA requires hard work and your son seems good. BUT… what if he gets injured?! What will he do without any education?! Put your kid in school “Dawn”

        Reply
  3. Lamar Hull

    That’s awesome Dawn! I appreciate the response. I love hearing stories like your sons. That reminds of me when I was young without the parental support that is why I created this website. What is his name? I would love to follow him. Also, check my other website out for my detailed book on how to be successful on and off the basketball court! http://betterbasketballplayer.com/

    Thanks again!

    Lamar

    Reply
  4. christian salvia

    This article is really inspirational to me and also it just lets me know that i have to work hard. Even tho i already knew that, but it reminds me. I am also trying my hardest to reach the NBA and i know its hard, but that doesn’t mean i’m going to quit. I practice about 5 hours everyday and sometimes if i have time to go early i practice 7 hours. I have been playing basketball all my life and sometimes it feels like this is what i was born to do. I’m a sophmore in high school and real soon i will hopefully play in the basketball team. The coach says he really wants me to play but he also wants to see if i have the heart for this sports. Basketball isn’t just a sport, its a way of life. Thats all i mostly do. Play play play practice practice practice. My favorite quote is “Hard work beats talent, when talent fells to work hard”. Anyways, thanks for this article it helps alot and gives me alot to think about and ofcourse work harder.

    Reply
  5. Lamar Hull

    Christina – I’m glad to hear stories like yours and all of the hard work you are putting in to the game. I’m glad this article is inspiring you because that is what it is meant to do. I will definitely follow you because I want to hear about your success! Keep up the hard work!

    Reply
  6. Noah rutledge

    Yeah I’m 15 and I love the game of basketball I work hard everyday an get told i will never make it by everyone and I just ignore them just like Jason Kidd said friends are out partying and I’m in the gym that’s how I am then there’s homerwork to I have to do all the time but I run cross country then play ball for 2 to 3 hours then go home and play ball for like 1 almost 2 hours then I do homework eat then do the same thing the next day any ways this article was inspiring to me also it’s made me think about a lot of things and If I want to make it in gonna have to work even harder every day thank you for all the good tips to I would love to hear more advise from you to help me out and I don’t have an email but I do have and Instagram it noah__rutledge__

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Noah – it is great to hear your passion for the game of basketball. It takes discipline to do what you do, which is to choose working out and focus on academics versus partying and consuming yourself with the many other things that could keep you distracted. I wish I had more focus when I was your age! I would recommend getting exposure if you are not and that is through AAU and top basketball camps. This is something that I wished I would have done more of, but I wasn’t fortunate to have wealthy parents. Not to say you need to have a ton of exposure outside of high school if you are really good, but it definitely helps! Just followed you, keep up the good work!

      Reply
  7. Jordan Cooper

    I am 13 years old, and I’m a freshman, and everyone in my grade is older than me. So I go to a gym every day to perfect my game. I have also been told I’m not going to make it. I get good grades in school also. This article really inspired me to become the best basketball player i can be. I will continue to practice everyday, and perfect my game. I am only 5’5, but i’m not going to let that stop me. I am determined to make it to the NBA.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Hey Jordan, keep working on your game! Don’t worry about what the haters say, they are just mad they are not doing what you are doing, which is working on your game everyday! The only way you can shut the doubters up is by working hard everyday and letting your results and accomplishments speak for you. Having great grades is super important! I can’t stress that enough!! I’m glad this article inspired you because that is what it is meant to do! You are the next Nate Robinson, you may hit a growth spurt…you never know! Keep up the hardwork and keep me posted on your progression on and off the court. You can email me at inspirationalbasketball20@gmail.com.

      Reply
  8. Quentin Bellasse

    I’m in the 8th grade but since my dad is in the military I live in spain. I practice and play pick up games about 8-9 hours on weekends but during the week I do about 3-4 . I’m the best shooter in the middle school. But I can’t do aau because I live overseas. I wish I could. And there’s no middle school basketball team because DODEA or DODDS schools don’t allow it. I am 4th best dribbler in Middleschool. But personally if they had a basketball team that would be better.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Quentin – thanks for providing your thoughts! I love to hear from young players and see their passion for the game. You are right, playing on a basketball team would help with team chemistry, your basketball IQ, developing your skill set within a team system and against other teams is necessary. I will say don’t worry about what you can’t control at the moment. I would encourage you to continue to work on the game. Since you can’t play on a team, find more time to work on your skills and perfect your game. When that opportunity comes, you will be ready! Are there camps, local leagues, etc. in Spain that you can attend in conjunction to playing pick-up? I always wanted to play professionally in Spain when I played in England!

      Reply
  9. Quentin Bellasse

    I’m 13 in 8th grade so they always pick on me . They always say stuf like short stack. I’m 5″2 at first I wanted to be shooting guard because I could shoot . But now since I’m so short I play PG.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Don’t worry about what people say about you or your height. That happened to me when I was young! At a young age, you have to work hard on your game and let your game do the talking. Basketball success comes to players who are gym rats and work on their skills day-in and day-out. You will gain respect no matter your height, when your game does the talking. That typically shuts the haters up.

      Reply
  10. T'Varsky Freeman

    Can you make it to the NBA as a redshirt in Junior College? Some people work harder than others and still dont make it to the NBA

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      T’Varksy – thanks for taking the time to read my article and asking such an important question! To answer your question, what college you go to and what your current situation is will not define who you can become. Yes, you can make it to the NBA as a redshirt in Junior College, but guess what, it won’t be easy. It may be a harder journey compared to others, but working harder than the next player, performing on the court, having the right coach and basketball program, and a little bit of luck a dream can become a reality, but again it isn’t easy. The article describes how hard it is to make it to the NBA, but those players that make it, make it through working hard every single day. Their work ethic and performance takes them to another level!

      Reply
  11. T'Varsky Freeman

    I’m also around people that dont work hard. Is that a bad thing? I cant find my motivation to just push me to go hard everyday.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Yes, studies show when you surround yourself around people who are competing and pushing themselves to get better every single day, that will motivate you to work harder. For me, I never really spent time with other people in my spare time. I was too busy working on my game even when no one else wanted to participate, which was fine with me because I knew what I wanted to do in life and understood my purpose in basketball. Something you should ask yourself, do you truly want to be good at basketball and reap the benefits of being a really good basketball player or are you doing it for some other reason? Your motivation should come from within. I loved the game so much, I was eager to get home from school and work on my game whether anybody else did it with me or not. I worked on my game and saw the benefits on the basketball court, which continue to increase my inner-motivation. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  12. David

    So basically, my parents always tell me that basketball means nothing. And for me basketball is life.im 14 years old, 5’3/5. And I don’t know any team I can play for. And I live in Canada. And that makes it even harder. Now I don’t know what to do people keep on telling that I’m toot short. And I workout 7h a week. And I’m trying to improve that but I don’t know how.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Hey David – thanks for responding and providing thoughts on “your dream”. I emphasized on “your dream” because that is what matters. Everyone should live their dream! You can’t focus on what other people think about your dream. You definitely need supportive people in your circle to continue to push you, you have to go to your local gym and find out who those people are. If you put in the work every single day, you will get better and your parents will come to see what basketball means to you. Being short doesn’t defy who you can become through hard work. I’m 5’9″ and played Division 1 basketball and professionally overseas. Guess how many times I was told I was too short and couldn’t make it? A LOT! I was even told by my brother and close relatives, but guess what they only became fans after I proved them wrong through working on my game every single day and showing them different. That’s what matters kid! How many hours, blood sweating tears, time, commitment, etc. are you willing to put in to the game. Everyone wants to become a great basketball player, but ask yourself are you willing to work harder, longer than the next kid your age? Are you hanging out with friends during the week or on the weekend rather than practicing? A lot of kids tell me they are working on their game several hours a week/day, but when I watch them play it doesn’t show. When you show people your skill, they will respect your height! I don’t know a lot about Canada, is there not a middle school, high school team that you can tryout for? I know there are school systems there, how do they give you the opportunity to play on a team? Last advice, stop caring about what people think, work on your game, let what people say be a chip on your shoulder and become the best basketball player you can be!

      Reply
  13. Jack cromer

    I’m jack I’m 13 and really good at basketball I’m really good at basketball and was one of only five people in my grade to make the a or b team at my school and 67 people tried out. I averaged 18.3 points last year and I play for an elite Aau team called the family do you think that I have a real shot at the nba?

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Hey Jack – thanks for reading and providing insights to your basketball story! I love seeing kids who truly have passion for the game. I would say this, every basketball player with the dream to play basketball starts out the same way, with a dream! The ones who work harder and smarter every single day, has the right coach and experiences with a little luck, anything is possible. You can definitely make it, the journey will be very tough, but it is truly up to you! You don’t need me to tell you that you can make it or not, believe in yourself and put in the time, that’s the most important thing!

      Reply
  14. Josh

    Hey Lamar im Josh im 16 and 6’4 i am currently comming off an injury and my grades are a little behind but i am very good in basketball and i am dedicated i am a junior in high school and although i know im going to miss this season i am going to work very hard to prepare for my senior year what can I do to improve and get ready for the next level of basketball

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Hey Josh – thanks for sending me a note and expressing your interest in taking your game to the next level! You are a junior in high school, so this is prime time for you. Sorry to hear that you got an injury! Get well soon man! Since you will be sitting out an entire season don’t waste it. Basketball players who take their game to the next level has not only the skill but a high basketball IQ. Since you will be out the first thing I would say do is get your grades up as high as they can be. It will be tough to make it to the level you know you can be at if you don’t have really good grades so don’t let them slip behind, make that your top priority. Think about, how many kids want to play D-1 basketball? Look at how many kids have already expressed their interest in playing in the NBA in the comment section of this blog post. That means there are a lot of players with great skill. If a D-1 college matches you up with another player or players and you guys are equal across the board, you are better in certain areas, but on the contrary one stands out by having really good grades, they are most likely going to bet on the kid with really good grades. The coaching staff knows they have a player who will not flunk out of school after they invested in him. Secondly, study the game. Watch film if you can, ask your coaches to watch film with you. Learn the areas where you can get better. We all can get better at basketball! Lastly, if you have any highlight tapes send them to schools of your choice. Check out my blog post about how to earn a basketball scholarship – https://inspirationalbasketball.com/how-to-earn-a-college-basketball-scholarship/. Also, have you taken the SAT, have you prepared for it? There is a lot to what you are asking for, it isn’t as simple as big just good at the game. You got this! Follow-up with me and let me know if you used some of the things we discussed and how it worked out for you. If i can help in any way let me know. Thanks!

      Reply
  15. Amos Abraham

    I told my mom that I want to be a NBA player, and she started talking about how it’s like playing lottery and that I should no longer want to be an NBA player. What should I do

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Keep working on your game, work harder than you ever have before and very frequently! Imagine where NBA players would be now if they listened to all the negative voices in their life? I’m sure at some point in their lives, someone told them they wouldn’t make it. NBA players work hard, have a lot of talent, and have the right opportunities. Always have a plan B and C, we all have the dream of making it to the NBA. If you don’t as we all can’t make it, what else do you want to do, what else do you be? Always keep that focus! Work hard on your game, be strong minded, and have options for your life!

      Reply
  16. Charlie

    I really want to be an nba player and I think the two things that are most important of all to become an nba player are good grades and practice. I’ve been trying hard all my life and if I keep it up I believe that I can make it the nba. Every day at the end of my practice I set goals and accomplish them. I believe

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Charlie, thanks for providing your story! You are right grades and practice is important. I would say it is also about how you practice when it comes to grades, basketball, life, etc. I can practice more hours, but if someone is out working me in less hours, they are benefiting long-term. Keep that perspective in mind. It is a good goal to set your eyes on the NBA, but also have a backup plan. Know what your passions are at every level. Keep dreaming and keep working hard!

      Reply
  17. Ezekiel Junior

    Good day Lamar i’m Ezekiel Junior i’m 18 years old i’m a citizen of Nigeria i’m 6’3 tall i have more interest in playing the basket ball and joining the NBA basketball team but i don’t have anyone to give me details on how to register to the college please i need your help on details thanks

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Ezekiel – Happy New Year! Thanks for sending me a message. Send me an email to my personal email address, you can find that on my contact page.

      Reply
  18. Kevin Jackson

    I did not use my real name for good reason. I played elite basketball in AAU, college, and in the pros(overseas). I just want to provide deeper insight into those statistics that were posted. The average basketball fan doesn’t have a clue of how good elite basketball players are – by elite, I mean guys playing major college basketball on up to the pro level(s) – and their work ethic and the quality of their training is reflected in this. It is hard. Very, very, very, hard. Everyone is a starry-eyed dreamer who believe that the odds don’t apply to them. There are players who could go down to virtually any YMCA in the country, and look like Michael Jordan … who will not log a single minute in the NBA. I am one of those players. These kids need to understand what they’re truly up against. The truth is better than coddling a child’s feelings, because then they can make a decision on whether they want to buckle down or just play for fun. The odds are, no matter how hard you work, you will not make it. While a lot of NBA players worked to make it, the same is true for the players who didn’t make it. I know many total gym rats who were never close to being NBA prospects. IMG Academy spits out well coached, well conditioned and hard-working basketball players every year who never sniff the league. Parents spending thousands upon thousands per year to give their child an advantage and they don’t make it to the NBA. Thats just one academy. Talent matters whether people want to accept it or not. If the NBA is your goal, just know that you are talking about being in the top 1% of prospects in the WORLD. Even then, there are no guarantees for a long career, as the average is about 4.5 to 5 years. This post was not to discourage but to encourage. Its not IMPOSSIBLE, but you should know that it is extremely unlikely, and that you should work on your game, mentally and physically, in a way that reflects that reality.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Thanks for sharing Kevin! I appreciate someone who has accomplished a lot in the game of basketball to share their opinion. I agree no article can reflect what it really takes to make it to college, NBA or overseas. That’s not the goal of this article, but the statistics are accurate. Really read the article and the comments. The goal is to encourage young players but be realistic! Yea, you can be like every other kid wanting to play in the NBA, but you must have a backup plan, like playing overseas, becoming specialized in a specific field, etc. The percentages of making it the NBA or even college on a full scholarship is a small percentage, kids miss this point and have to plan for what happens when they don’t achieve that dream that every other kid is dreaming about. Overall, I agree with what you are saying because it is reality. I still encourage kids to dream, work hard and become a better person at the end of the day. Dreaming is what young people do and it is a great thing! Have dreams, there is nothing wrong with trying…if we said don’t try because the percentages are low, the American dream dies which is what makes this country great. It is believed anybody can be successful with a lot of hard work. Doesn’t necessarily mean at basketball, but at something!

      Reply
  19. Dru Ouellette

    i am 12 years old, i have played at the td garden . and i have been playing since i was 3. Ive always loved the game and it is the one sport i would practice 5-6 times a week for 3-6 hours. I am 5’6 Im the best on my team. and i average at least 20 points a game. i would like to know if I should keep pushing myself or should I still consistently do this? THANKS =)

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Hey Dru – thanks for sharing your story! That’s impressive. You are doing what you love to do and if you are passionate about it, keep doing it! Not to say this hard work is going to result in you making the NBA, because the odds are so small, but that doesn’t mean your hard work won’t payoff. I worked out a lot at your age…and I would say I’m successful now running my own business. I would create this success to my work ethic, determination, and perseverance on and off the court. Those habits created behaviors that stuck with me for the rest of my life and I’m so thankful for it. So, there is a purpose continue to do what you love and wherever it takes you, you will look back and be thankful for the hard work in your younger days!

      Reply
  20. Email

    Hi I was wondering if you could answer my question is how do you get in the nba and what nba scouts are looking thank you

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Hey – thanks for reading and commenting. There is no sure way to get in the NBA. I would suggest first and foremost, love the game! Have a genuine passion and love for the game. Next, work on your game every chance that you get. Work on the fundamentals of the game every single day. Spend hours in the gym perfecting your game. Don’t just go through the motions, push yourself every time you workout. Play a lot of basketball, recreational, competitive in the AAU arena, go to various local and national camps. Have good grades! Get in to college by being recruited. You have to work on a lot of the things mentioned. Are you a superstar on your high school team? Create a highlight video, write men’s basketball programs. Do these things and there are a lot of other things you can do as well, but there is no guarantee you will make it to the NBA. Give yourself the best chance to take your career as far as you can whether that is the NBA, D-League, Overseas, etc. Always have a back-up plan or another passion because making it to the NBA is very tough and is a slim chance.

      Reply
  21. Pratyansh Sehgal

    Hey lamar that was a really good article!!…This is pratyansh…I’m a citizen of India…I’m 17 yrs old standing 5’10″…looking forward to enter in the nba or nba d league is it possible for me to do so?? I Work Hard every day for 3 to 4 hours…Day by day the interest of basketball is increasing in India.And the numbers of players r too!!…The above question is for me as well as for all the talented players of our nation who r eager to know as well..we r working our butt off every single day to reach that level,to enter in that zone,that aura!!..soo plz we r eager to know….plz do reply…😊

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Pratyansh….thanks for the message and its great hearing that players from your country are interested in playing in the NBA. As the article mentions, the NBA isn’t for everyone. It takes a unique skill and talent to make it to the NBA. As a 17 year old who is 5’10”, my question to you is how much time did you put in to the game growing up? You have to understand there are millions of kids your age doing the exact same thing that you are. Are you being recruited by the tops schools in your country? Do you have any opportunities to play on any national teams there? Those are the questions I would ask someone in your shoes. If the answer is yes, you are doing a lot of the right things! I played overseas and there are a ton of great opportunities there as well to make a living playing the game you love. I would say keep working hard, make the right connections, market yourself on YouTube, write college coaches, get yourself out there so that people can see your talent.

      Reply
  22. Khalid

    Hey Lamar!
    My name is Khalid I’m 5’3 and a half a little overweight in 8th grade. Im a starting Point Guard who plays JV level instead of U14 i average about 16 PPG and 7 assists. I was wondering if you can give me advice on how to lose weight and get taller! And can u please read the link below?

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Khalid – thanks for reading and commenting…In terms of losing weight, the first step is to eat the right foods that are healthy. Reduce the amount of junk food and unhealthy foods. That has to be a top priority! Make conditioning, whether that is basketball and/or weightlifting workouts a part of your every day schedule. Running and exercise is important. You have to be diligent and consistent about the things mentioned to help you lose weight. In terms of getting taller, please let me know if you find out…I have always wanted to know that answer as well :)…

      Reply
  23. joseph migila

    iam Joseph migila, an albino person in condition, i live in the eastern part of Africa a country named Tanzania, i am very very inspired with this article. off course i know that great things don’t happen so simple, i am 19 years old and i play basketball, i am in the last year of my college now but due to my albino condition i have been pushed away and i have misses a lot of chances to exercise my talent, i have never give up and yes i have this dream of becoming an NBA player i need you to help me even the procedures because i have got no idea where to start. i do drills everyday and i even played in my college team but the situation here is bad because albinos are hunted and killed so most of the time i hide please help me just the procedures for outside US players to focus to the NBA.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Hi Joseph – thanks for reading my article. I’m glad the article inspired you…that’s the goal, but on the contrary, the real purpose of this article is to be realistic about what it takes to make it to the NBA. Your situation is very interesting and I honestly don’t know any legal ways for you to get out of your situation. For me, I wouldn’t even talk about what it takes to make it to the NBA, it is more so how do you survive? It is sad to see a specific type of person or group is hunted by other people, that is disturbing to me. Your focus should be how do you survive and get out of that country? That would be the first step for you to open up better basketball opportunities for yourself. To answer your question, it takes a ton of hard work, dedication, skill, talent, and many other things. There is no secret formula on making it to the NBA…you have love the game and sacrifice many things to develop your skills in to a NBA caliber type player. This comes with experience, hard work, the right exposure, coaching, and many other things.

      Reply
      • joseph migila

        thank you very very much you have just opened up my mind and yes the first step i gotta go out of this country i know it is hard but it is all about being dedicated, i really thank you for a good advice. you asked me on how do i survive, off course it is sad but what i always do is i play where there are a lot of people and that is an outdoor court as you know people like me cannot take 10 minutes on sun so i always wait till 4 pm and most of the time i stay inside.it is becouse there are no indoors courts even in my college, anyways i wont give up and i will do my best thank you ..

        Reply
  24. Jaike Lockhart

    I’m 13 yrs old and like others love the sport of basketball. I’m 5’7 and play with some other the starting players for the varsity because they stay on my block. I would have thought I couldn’t make it before I saw this web site. By the way i’m going to focus more on my grades. Thank you Mr. Hull

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Jaike – thanks for reading! That’s awesome to see you on the varsity team at such a young age. I will say this article doesn’t say it is easy to make it to the NBA and doesn’t even mean if you are the best in your area or your high school team you have a great chance of making it to the NBA. I don’t want to kill your confidence, but it is very tough to make it to the NBA. Not to say you can’t do it, but there are a lot of factors that get players to that level and yes, grades are one of them. Even if you don’t make it to the NBA, grades should be one of the most important things you focus on because you always need a backup plan. Having good grades will help you standout amongst all of the other applicants for a specific job.

      Reply
  25. John Espinosa

    Hey I’m 21 years old, I was going to college but then I had stopped because I didn’t have enough money to go on with my next semester. Plus I had to start all over and become a freshmen in college, just because I had transferred from one school to another and not all my credits had went over. But I never wanted to give up playing but I somewhat had to just to get a job and try to save up money to go back to school and play. If I do go to the gym everyday work in my game try my best to perfect it would I still have a chance of making it or is it too late for me ? I don’t really go to camps because I don’t have the money for it or the transportation so if I was to try and get exposure i wouldn’t really get it. For parental support I don’t really have much I mainly just have me, myself, and I. Which is fine cuz I can do it all on my own but my main problem with that is money. Reading this article helped me a lot and I wanted to know if it was too late for a guy like me. Also if you don’t mind if you can tell me how much would it be to have a good basketball coach/trainer to come and help me try and make it.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      John – thanks for the comment and for reading my article! I think any player that has a unique talent and are really good will be noticed. Biggest thing for you is to get back in school and display your skills, and whatever happens after that will be based on your basketball performance. I’m not sure what level you are playing at but I think about Allen Iverson. He went to jail in high school and was counted out, and still made it to the NBA. Again, he was a unique talent, all state in high school basketball and football. Dominated as a freshman as a D-1 player. Making it to the NBA is a slim chance, but work hard and live with the results.

      Reply
  26. quinten

    from quinten im 13 and going to high school and I have been working hard and putting in the work as much as I can but people around me that are 15 16 hardly put in work and they are better then me and idk y and is it ok to ball hog a little to get like 25 points or so a game and get no assit or get assit and points because I really want scouts to find me and watch me play and get noticed but I here its hard when you are living in Canada

    Reply
  27. Sergey

    Ok so I was at a clippers game yesterday and i said wow these people play basketball and get paid. I have been playing basketball since i was 6 years old and im 13 now. Im really good at it and everyone says so to. Im 5’3 but im not letting that stop me. But i relized that its so so hard to get in and thats kinda holding me back and i dont have any motivation. Im in 8th grade and i have good grades

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Don’t let the fact that it is hard to make it to the NBA, stop you from working on your game and perfecting your skills. If that was the case, none of the players you are watching would have made it. Yes, it is hard to make it to the NBA, but that doesn’t stop millions of players from trying. Developing your skills provides a sense of satisfaction whether you make it to the NBA or not. There are other avenues such as overseas, D-league where you get paid to play the game. Please don’t make your passion about getting paid, that will get you nowhere because that motivation will not last. Your passion should be for the love of the game and let everything else fall in place. Keep working hard!

      Reply
  28. Leon

    This article just makes it that much easier for me to appreciate the players talent that is being displayed at the NBA or even college level. It seems like too many people forget that all the players in the NBA had to work extremely hard to get to the position they are in. People are quick to say that an average or under average player is bad or terrible, but at the same time seem to forget that that average player was most likely a standout college and high school player and just happens to be surrounded by all of the bests standout college players who are doing whatever they can to stop him. The NBA is really the best of the best and this article really reminded me that a bench warmer in the NBA would probably look like a legend if he went to a local gym and joined a pickup game.

    Reply
  29. Jose Ozuna

    Great article ! Im 21 right turn 22 next month and last year I tried out for the NBA D league in NY and was nervous at first. Once I got into the groove I was fine and honestly was not scared of the competition. I told myself with more hard work I can see myself over most of those guys in the tryout. It was an amazing experience and showed me what it takes to play at that level. I definitely want to make the NBA one day and I will not give up until I do. For most kids nowadays who to play in the NBA keep playing and practicing don’t ever let up those slim chances could make your dream a reality. College is not necessary to play in the NBA if you haven’t attended but obviously it’s preferred many players like myself have just tried out for the D league made it and then find themselves into the NBA but you have to work hard and put your heart out there. If you believe in yourself then you are half way to achieving your dreams

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Jose that’s awesome man! I wish you nothing but success. It is good to hear players who are so close to fulfilling their dream. You are right, keep working hard, have the passion for the game, and let the chips fall. Thanks for sharing!

      Reply
  30. Kobe Bryant

    I’m 14 years old and a freshman in high school. I played for the freshman team at my school team this year and fared alright. It is my dream to make it to the NBA but as much as I want to work on my game, I never get a chance to for more than a couple hours a day. Some people count me out because I don’t look the part as I am Indian. But I’ve got one of the better shots in my high school and I’m a solid 5’11 and still growing. Any suggestions?

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      It doesn’t matter what you look like, so don’t let that discourage you. Hard work and determination doesn’t discriminate. My suggestion is find as much time as you can to work on your game. You have to outwork all of the players that are going after the same goal. It is wanting it more than your competition. I’m sure there are some talented guys in your school, do you want it more than them? I know you said your time is limited but you can pick up a basketball and work on your game outside in the driveway. Perfecting your game every day the right way, will be the key to your success. You are practicing for tomorrow’s opportunity!

      Reply
  31. Josh Story

    Hi, im 12 years old and I want to join the NBA.This website is awesome, have anymore tips

    Reply
  32. Demond Clayton

    Lamar Hull said “You were at a disadvantage because you are only 5’9″ how so? There were several people shorter than you have made their way on to a NBA roster. The famous Muggsy Bogues is 5’3 and the recently retired Earl Boykins is 5’5,could you clarify your statement?

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Demond – thanks for the comment! I’m saying I was at more of a disadvantage because of the great odds of making it to the NBA, then being as short as I am. You mentioned a few short NBA players. Let me ask you this, what’s the percentage of short players that size compared to the total number of NBA players to ever play in the league? Let me know that percentage is! I’m not saying I ever doubted myself and always believed I could make it, what I’m saying based on my size it was lot harder, I needed to be super special at that size to make it, because you don’t see it as often.

      Reply
  33. Josh lanceon

    I’m doing suicide if I don’t make it to the NBA or I’ll ask the Illuminati to put me in the nba. Like y waste half of your life on nothing

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Definitely wouldn’t want you to commit suicide, but why wasting half of your life on nothing is one way of looking at it. What if all the current NBA players thought that it was for nothing, what would the NBA look like? Everybody has a dream, those who work hard consistently, have the determination and perseverance and some luck are successful at whatever they do. Not saying you would make it, but if you don’t try if you truly love the game, then you have wasted time.

      Reply
  34. Shawn Shaukat

    I’m 13 years old and am 6’3. I play on a 9th grade team and manage to still average a double-double. My love for basketball is so high. The NBA has been a dream of my since i was 9. I work hard and practice almost everyday for 2-3 hours. I feel like i have the potential but i just don’t know how to get in the eyes of scouts. I just wanted to know if i have the chance of going big or not.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Shawn that is a pretty good size for 13 year old. Those are pretty good stats as well! I would say just keep working on your game everyday and getting better, improve on your strengths and weaknesses. Play AAU, go to exposure basketball camps in your local area, get a good college or high school mentor/basketball trainer who can help improve you skills, post your highlights on YouTube, dominate the game in middle school and high school, write the colleges of your choice NOW while you are in middle school and let them know you are interested and why (basketball and school reasons), send the coaches your stats, grades, accolades, basketball schedule, coaches/parents contact info, and most importantly have AWESOME grades. Not just okay grades, but standout from the million kids who have the same dream as you and want to make it to the NBA. Here are 2 good articles you should read that I wrote: https://inspirationalbasketball.com/how-to-earn-a-college-basketball-scholarship/ and https://inspirationalbasketball.com/99-ways-to-earn-a-basketball-scholarship/. Hope that helps. Good luck and thanks for reading/commenting!

      Reply
  35. Hunter

    I’ve been playing basketball since the 4th grade but it’s hard to get outside since I live in new York but I get outside when I can no matter the weather I work my hardest and my team had the best record in new York this year and I just don’t really have the parental support though.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Hunter – thanks for the comment. That’s tough when young kids do not have the parent support. I would say don’t let that stop you. I think about all the players who make it to college and NBA, some not all, have some interesting stories where they didn’t have any support, but still made a way to the NBA through perseverance, not taking no for an answer, and determination. So many kids want to make it to the NBA, so I’m not sure how you will get more practice time, but you need to figure it out. Whether that is sitting down with your parents yourself and showing them your passion for the game and having their support to get to a local gym would be so important for you. I don’t know what that looks like, but find relatives, friends, etc. that can help. I think about the story of Derek Anderson former NBA player, read here: https://inspirationalbasketball.com/stamina-book-written-by-derek-anderson/. This guy grew up without his mom and dad for the most part, lived in abandoned apartments, had a son when he was a teenager, was helping the elder take their groceries in for money. This guy made it to the NBA, he didn’t let his circumstances dictate his passion and dedication and will to live out his dream. Read this story and don’t let your surroundings determine your next steps. Don’t take no for an answer!

      Reply
  36. John Blessing Shyirambere

    i live in the u.k. and i want to make it to the nba, would it be easier going there through an american college or through a professional team here.Or should i join the euroleugue. If im not studying, im ever playing basketball or watching it, my parents dont want me to play proffessional bball, but that just gives me a desire to be better. I am 13 yrs old and play for a national team in england, i also bought cant be guarded, do you think it will work,

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Hi John, thanks for the comment and reading this article! I would say it would definitely be great to be a standout collegiate player here in the states, but if you are a great basketball player it doesn’t matter where you are located. If you are 13 and are playing for the national team, you have a lot of upside. A lot more European players are being drafted in to the NBA. Rubio was a young PG on the national team and now he is playing in the NBA. I actually played in Kings Lynn England for a bit. Great country! Anyways, talent will always get noticed if you are a great player, that’s the key! Having the skill set, displaying that skill set at a high level and being in the right environment helps. I would encourage you to keep working on your game everyday, displaying great skill at a young age for the national team, write some US college coaches if your desire is to come to the states. If you are a standout college player here at a high level, you will get noticed more for the NBA draft. A lot of kids don’t make it to the NBA, so the journey is tough but believe in yourself and continue to work on your game and let everything else take care of itself.

      Reply
  37. Nadhav

    This article was a good inspiraton to me thank you. Iam an indian in ohio, iam the best shooter in my county with an amzing stroke i make my shots a lot. Iam going to 9 grade trying to make jv and varsity, but the coaches don’t have a good impression on me even though i averaged 15 pts in 8 grade. Iam 5/9 at 128 pds. The problem is that the coaches only think i can shoot even though iam working super hard on my weaknesses which my team mates have recognized and told me but the coaches arent honoring that. What should i do? and what are some stuff as a 9 grader i should do for stronger and bigger arms? How many hrs should i spend in the gym. What are some reallly good camps i should go for exposure? Is the img basketball camp worth it? Thanks a lot

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Thanks for reading and providing your comment. That’s good to hear you are a great shooter. I would say be an all around player, do the the little things, such as rebounding (boxing out), diving on the floor for loose balls, playing great defense, being able to handle the ball very well. Those things will definitely put you ahead. Don’t worry about what people think, understanding your weaknesses is what you have to do (this is the hardest step) and then improving on those weaknesses is the next step! Get a mentor who knows the game that can really help you. Players who are good, shouldn’t have a hard time with that because people gravitate to talent. I’m not going to put a number on how many hours you should practice in the gym, look Pistol Pete Maravich up, he used to spend north of 4-5 hours a day practicing. He wanted greatness, so he just worked on his skill set to make himself a better player everyday. He was in love with the process. Be in love with the process and journey and your will, should help you determine how many hours you need to get better and improve at a higher level. A lot of kids are spending tons of hours in the gym everyday, I spent about 2 hours practicing every day and wish i would have gave more. I made it to college and professional basketball overseas, but could have definitely gave more. I’m not sure of any camps in Ohio, just go to Google and search for “youth basketball camps + location” or “basketball camps + location”. I’m hopeful I will have my basketball camp finder updated soon with a ton of great local basketball camps for each state. Stay tuned…

      Reply
  38. Nate

    Hey, my name is Nate and I’m in eight grade and I’m 6’3. Ball is my life. I’m currently not on an aau team right now. I play at a small D5 school, But one day I am looking to play at a high level such as D1 ball. My team went to state this year, and I’m just looking to get my name out there. I love to play the sport, I spend about 3 hours a day working on my game, and I will be joining a school summer league team. I’m a good mid-range shooter and three shooter. Just curious on what the chances are of playing at a higher level on day?

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Nate thanks for the comment! It is really up to you. How bad do you want to play at the next level? Are your 3 hours a day spent wisely? Are you working extremely hard during those 3 hours? Are you working on the right skill set and fundamentals? Are you improve your weaknesses and your strengths? Are your grades outstanding? I would encourage you to play AAU to get that type of experience. Put some highlights on YouTube and attend exposure camps or basketball camps that college programs are having. Write college coaches expressing your interest in their school and basketball program and providing a highlight tape. Let your talent speak for itself, be the best in your area period! Don’t leave any question!

      Reply
  39. Daniel

    Hi, great article, i’m sure it will motivate plenty of young people.
    I am 15 years old living in Lithuania, so college basketball or AAU aren’t an option, it will be even harder for me to make it. Anyway, i’m a great shooter, the best in my school(i’m a freshman). I really want to make it in to the NBA and I believe that i am prepared to work my butt off for it. I practice about 5 hours a day, and when i’m not playing ball, i’m usually at home watching NBA games and studying them. My grades are good, so academics won’t be trouble when it comes to my career. I do have very bad genetics everywhere except in height(my grandpa is 6’7). I’m 6’1 and I weigh only about 140lbs, so I can’t play above the Small Forward position and I sometimes struggle to post-up smaller guards depending on their toughness. I’m also not the fastest, so I’ve been running a lot lately trying to solve that problem. I’ve also been going to the gym and eating a lot, looking to gain that weight and athleticism. My favourite player is Kobe, and I believe that i have a similar mentality and mindset to him. That’s about all I have to say, if you’d like to contact me and ask about how my career is going, you can add and pm me or Instagram(dakarorskis) or Facebook(Danielius Karakorskis). I’m thinking about buying your book, it really intrigued me and I hope it will help.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Hi Daniel, thanks for the comment. You sound like you have a good plan and are very focused and determined. My advice is to get better everyday and work harder than the next person, be in love with the process and journey and continue to improve. Seek a mentor that has the knowledge to guide you through the process. Yes, my book can be a mentor but will be a supplement to a personal mentor who you can see face to face. If you buy the book let me know how it helped or didn’t help. My email address is inspirationalbasketball20@gmail.com. I added you on Facebook. I’m looking forward to seeing your career unfold. Lastly, have no fear when it comes to guarding any other player!

      Reply
  40. Nate

    Thanks for the reply. Do you think cause I’m playing in such a small school that it will be harder for me to go on to the next level?

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Not at all. If you have unseen talent then no…Put yourself in position to be different and highly skilled. Put your highlights on YouTube, write coaches, do the things others won’t do. Continue to work on your game everyday, harder than the next!

      Reply
  41. Chris

    Dear Lamar,

    I’m 15 and I was born and lived in Athens, Greece until 2009 when I moved to America. My dream is to be an NBA player. I practice as much as I can but its hard because I have an ingrown toenail that can’t be operated on. I’m a really good midrange shooter and I can explode to the basket. It helps having a double rim because I’ve only practiced on it for a year and I went from 0 to 100 from then to now with my shooting. I only started playing basketball last year as well. I didn’t make the freshman team but that just motivated me to keep practicing. Once I get rid of this injury, do you think that with how quickly I keep getting better, I can make my team next year, put up good numbers that keep getting better throughout the years and then one day make it to the NBA? The only thing keeping me back from practicing all day is that injury. I hope it’s done soon.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Hi Chris – sorry to hear about your toenail issue, but your story is still inspiring. Experiences are what make people who they are! You getting cut from the team was probably the best thing for you. That puts a certain type of drive in you to want to succeed whether you make it next year or not, you are developing a specific characteristic that will make you successful in life. I wouldn’t focus on making it to the NBA as it is very difficult. I would focus on being the best basketball player you can be by consistently working on your game, making your team, getting playing time and continuing your success in the game. Good luck this upcoming year and I wish you luck in your basketball career.

      Reply
  42. Raffie Banisa

    Hi I’m 13 years old and I’m about 5’9 5’10 ish. I play basketball a lot and I really love the game. I have dreams of making to the NBA or playing in college. But the bad part is I know that I won’t. I just know that there are a lot of people that are a lot better than me. I am a really good player in my opinion but I just know that I won’t make it. I do some camps and play on some teams and I am the best out of all my friends. Can you give me some reasons or motivation on what to do or what kind of mind set to have?

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Raffie – thanks for the comment! It is always interesting to hear young player’s story and what they are going through. Playing in the NBA and even college is tough. Your first step to being a better basketball player is your mindset. If you don’t believe you can make it whether you make it or not, you have defeated yourself already, you might as well stop playing the sport! I didn’t care how many people told me I was too short, the odds, wasn’t good enough, etc. I still worked on my game every day to prove them wrong and to prove to myself that hard work pays off and it did for me. At 5’8″ I played D-1 and professionally overseas. Even in the business world, I was told I’m not good enough, not smart enough and now I own my own business. Again, the first step is to change your mindset and believe in yourself. Don’t worry about what you can’t control, which is knowing there are a ton of kids who have the same dream. Control your perspective of what you need to accomplish which is getting in the gym and work out as hard as you can every day consistently. Go to google and search for the motivational speaker Eric Thomas. I listen to him every morning when I get discouraged because we all do at times. However, there is a difference between feeling discouraged and being discouraged. Overcome your fears of failing and give it your all and let the chips fall. Good luck, you can accomplish great things by having a positive mind and outlook!

      Reply
  43. Isaiah

    Lamar,
    I, like millions of other kids, have a passion for basketball. I absolutely love the game. My problem is that I’m 14, and I work 20-30 hours at a local restaurant. I spend a lot of time with my family. My parents do not like the game, and tell me that it is just impossible to be in the NBA when there are kids living in poverty with nothing else to do but to play basketball 24/7. I know that with my tight schedule, it is very hard to ride my bike 20 minutes to a nearby park to practice for 3-4 hours. It’s hard for me to find time, but I love the game too much to give it up. If I’m lucky, I practice once a week for 3-4 hours at that park. I’ve asked my parents to install a basketball goal or purchase a portable one, but being the anti-basketball people they are, they won’t. Currently, I’m going into the eighth grade. In 7th, I was on the bench for the B team and was only 5’3″. I have grown a couple inches and have improved my mechanics, but still lack the time to play. What should I do?

    Reply
  44. Isaiah

    I should add…
    I work only in the summers at this restaurant…
    It’s hard to get to a gym in the fall or winter for my parents…

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Isaiah – thanks for the comment. My question for you is how bad do you want it? I know you are young and I have seen families and parents make decisions for their kids not understanding that they are crippling their child from future development. It is tough when your parents don’t support your passion, but do you support your passion is the question? I can’t give you specific advice on how because I’m not in your shoes, but figuring out will be a challenge for you, but it comes back to how bad do you want it. Do you want it kind of bad or will you be fully invested in the development of your game. I guarantee there are other kids in your shoes somewhere in the world, but they are finding a way. Whether that is dribbling outside, working on your form, getting to that park when you can on a consistent basis, working on your game before work or when you have time to get some extra reps at practice. You mentioned that you play on the B team, how many times have you went before practice and stayed after practice while the gym was still open and worked on your game?

      Reply
  45. Marcel Jr Dieurestil

    I want to get better at basketball everyday so after high school I can play at a good college but my parents don’t support me in basketball what should I do.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Marcel – I’m actually writing an article on this topic…stay tuned. It seems like this happens to a lot of kids. Can you be specific about how your parents don’t support you in basketball?

      Reply
  46. Ryan

    I’m 15 and everyone told me I should try out for the basketball team and I made the team. But my coach quit before we started practice and now I have no way of practicing with my team. I can only practice by myself until we find a coach and I’m great at basketball but I can’t get better without no coach BTW I’m about 5,10 9th grade and can almost dunk

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Ryan – congrats on making the team. You will have to change your mindset! Don’t get me wrong have an experienced coach/mentor guiding you along the way is super important in developing your game, but what about the ton of hours you spend at home working out on your game alone, your coach won’t be there. That is what YouTube and the internet are for. There are tons of resources to help you develop your game, great coaches are online and will provide tons of drills to develop your skill as long as you execute. You can only control what you can control. If there is no coach, no team, work on your game religiously until that situation changes. Don’t put your destiny in your view of your circumstance by not having a coach right now.

      Reply
  47. Charles

    I am 12 and i wanted to go to the nba since i was 10 put i always made pg jv not pg varisty i want to go pro like any time soon

    Reply
  48. Jasper Kibari Nyanjom

    I’m a 19 year old living in Kenya.I’m 6″1_ – – 1.84m tall and I want to make it to the NBA badly enough…I know I’ll make it there soon enough…I’m still in High school and I workout everyday…I work very hard because I have to make my dream a reality…thankyou for this article,It’s shown me I’m on the right track.

    Reply
  49. Emiliano Hernandez

    Im 14 and want to be in the NBA but basketball is my one and only dream I need advice on how to make it as a high school player, collage, then NBA please if you can reply it would mean the world to me

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Emiliano – thanks for the comment. Work hard on your game every chance you get, have a good grades, be noticed online and at popular camps. Small percentage of players make it, but don’t give up not trying!

      Reply
  50. Blake

    Thank you for this website Lamar it has made me think that I will have to work my butt of even more and I will say this to you I am a 13 soon 14 year old 6 footer but I am on the chunkier side which I hate but I am willing to put in the hard work to at least move past the highschool level my dream of course is to become an nba player but I don’t know if I will have the talent I’m a pretty good fadeaway shooter and I hope that I can start being more ambidextrous so I can go right or left instead of just right. I just want to say thank you Lamar you honestly sound like a great guy and all of these comments about basketball you reply to them thank you for putting the time and effort into this article for everyone to see I hope you get better at basketball and have a fun life doing it.

    Sincerely, Blake
    My Instagram is balakay_is_ballin
    Thanks again Lamar

    Reply
  51. Westley

    Hi, my name is Westley I’m 14 years old and about 5ft 7 inches I understand from reading the previous comments that you believe amazing things can happen if you out in the work and time. Anyway I was wondering I’m in 8th grade and am a shooting guard I’m wondering if I should ask my coach to play point guard which I am defiantly good enough to be starting point guard, I was wondering this because if I ever do make it to the NBA I will most likely play point guard because of my height. Can I have your thoughts on this

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Westley – thanks for commenting. A lot of questions to ask before I can help you.

      Are members of your family tall (dad, mom, uncles, siblings)?
      What’s your shooting percentage?
      Does your coach put you at the PG spot at all?

      I can tell you from my experiences, I’m 5’9 and most of my family members are short. I played PG in high school but averaged 30 points per game my senior year. I was the best shooter, ball-handler and everything else, but no way would i play SG in college.

      Reply
  52. Lamar Hull
  53. pawas

    I am a 8th grader extremely well at ball 2 time best player of my school,dreaming of NBA,but I think that I have REALLY less time for it.Is it true?

    Reply
  54. Sam Colin

    I take a bunch of AP classes and my parents make me do all my homework and projects before I go outside.When I finally get outside itso dark and I can barely see.I’m a sophomore and I’m trying to make the team and I think I’ll make it cause the people ineed my school are lazy but I’m more worried about after I make the team ifI’ll get picked up by a college any advice?

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Sam you can’t worry about what is out of your control, focus on what you can do everyday to improve your skills (basketball, IQ, academics, etc.), ability to be recruited, which i mention in a lot of my comments and this post. Position yourself! That’s all you can ask of yourself, work hard and good talent isn’t hard to find!

      Reply
  55. Shawn A. Shaukat

    I am 14 years old and 6’5. I weigh 200 pounds. I am currently playing varsity basketball as a freshman at Seminole high school. I average about 14 points and 12 rebounds. Our team went to the final 5 of Florida last year so the team is pretty good. I have a strong work ethic. I play all positions but mainly Small Forward and Center. I am a big man that can shoot, dunk, make smart plays and passes. I play aau and my team went to the international finals at Disney. My grades are good and i maintain a 3.8 GPA with advanced classes. I still manage to practice 2 hours a day. My coach said if i could become more athletic then i could be ranked in the state. I feel like i have incredible potential but i need some way to get my name out to coaches and colleges. But i don’t know how to and also i dont know if i have a chance to be something special or not. Most of the people I’ve played against have said that i could make it somewhere big if i kept practicing. I wanted to ask a professional like to get some accurate information.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Shawn – that’s great stuff. You definitely sound like you have talent! Read a lot of my comments and this post. Check out my book on my homepage or Amazon “Beginners Guide to Becoming a Better Basketball Player by Lamar Hull”. The resources are out there, YouTube, books, creating highlight videos, going to exposure camps, playing AAU, dominating in high school, they are endless.

      Reply
  56. david malto

    hi do you think i can make the nba if i work hard iam really weak and only 5’9 a freshman the coaches dont think iam really good at basketball but everyone around me does any tips

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      David – it doesn’t matter what I say, what coaches or what other people think. It is on you and the work ethic you have and the consistent time you put in to your game. Making it to the NBA is very hard and as you can see tons of kids have that same dream. Only a select few make it. Work on your game religiously and let the outcome play out the way it is supposed to. You will see if your skills are comparable to other top players based on your work ethic, persistence, determination, and energy. This will give you a good understand to see what it takes! You need to put yourself up against the top players and one way to do that is play AAU and be a star on whatever team you play on. Don’t let outside voices determine your success, put the time in!

      Reply
  57. Jordan young

    So how good would u have to be to join the nba?cuz you said your averaged 30 points and still didn’t make it…

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Jordan – great question…I averaged about 30 points in high school my senior year. Tons of players can and do average that in high school but doesn’t mean they are going to the NBA. Some players average less than that in high school and make it to the NBA. It all depends on exposure, skill set, competition level, playing against some top prospects. I was one of the most talented players in my area and didn’t really test my skill set against top Division 1 players on a consistent basis. If I did I probably wouldn’t have averaged 30 a game. My high school was small and so where all the schools we played against. I don’t take anything a way from my work ethic and the time I put in to the game, but I wasn’t good enough especially at 5’9″ I needed to be exceptional at that size and in high school and i didn’t play against top players who already had division 1 scholarships wasn’t my fault, high school just didn’t play against those types of schools. There are a million of kids and only a select few make it to the NBA, not everyone is going to make it. The best of the best will!

      Reply
  58. Ginobili Cornwall

    I’m 13 I started playing basketball last year summer I’m a great student and I love basketball I’ve been training hard putting up shots bit this article has really helped me and showede what I have to do I mean I’ve been training hard but not hard enough I’m 6’1 I play SG but I live in a small island of Antigua and Barbuda I’ve watched alllll the basketball videos I sleep with my too but I think I’m lacking opportunity because of where I live but I won’t let that stop me I have to work harder putting in hours every single day but I know I will make it and I know you guys will too see you guys in 2023.

    Ginobili Cornwall

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Ginobili – I like your mindset and determination. Don’t every think where you are located determines your opportunity. A lot of kids make it from small areas. Get your stuff up on youtube consistently. Write college coaches, go to any exposure basketball camps that you can near your area if there are any. You should be recording all of your workouts and games, etc. If your talent comes through that screen, people will see.

      Reply
  59. Shahbaz Singh Goraya

    Hii Lamar, I’m from India & a 19 yr old guy & 6’3″ tall.I played for last 3 seasons of my high school as a main starter & competed at d district level. But since I had to migrate to Australia, I dropped over an year & a half after completing my high school with good grades, & didn’t competed or played with a team & a coach for almost 2 years now. I haven’t been able to find d necessary guidance & supervision needed 2 succeed & learn at a young age. Despite all d hardships I’m trying my level best 2 become d best ball player I can become, whatever I know from past experiences & learning from Internet (YouTube especially).D Situation will stay like this till I don’t get 2 Australia & get started with my life on track, while at d same time , utilizing my free time working out, playing with local college guys 2 makemy NBA dream become a reality. So I wanna ask u2 how 2 take that next step of getting even closer 2 my ambition ……….

    Reply
  60. Abdul

    I know I was born to be a Basketball player, I am 16 and 6″3 1/2 and a very athletic player I can dunk as well..and I think I’m still growing taller. However I’m in my Junior yr and I didn’t play on the team my Sophomore and Freshman yr due to me failing Math class. I am not good at Math and I really don’t want that to get in the way of me playing at the next level. I want to be the best player and dominate the game…but my coach told me I have a lack of experience and said it would be tough for me to understand the pace of the game…I want to prove him wrong and show him I can be his best and dominate…All my life I’ve been an underdog. I wanna show people and prove doubters I’m up next! Anyways I live in Canada and want to play D1 in the States…with me lacking experience is it possible?? Or do I need to do D2 or D3 then work my way up?? Either way I have one more yr of Highschool to show scouts I’m a beast…do I need to avg 20 and above?? Thank you.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Abdul – thanks for the comment. To keep that chip on your shoulder, work hard every day. Make your grades a top priority or it won’t matter how good you are. There is always someone just as good with better grades. Don’t worry about how many points you need to average, focus on being the best at your position, hustling on every play, being a great teammate, be coachable, have great grades, and work hard every day. Everything else will take care of itself!

      Reply
  61. Abdul

    I’m posting this comment just in case if you didn’t receive the other one.

    Man I’m 16 and 6’3 and really love this game of Basketball..
    I fell in love with this game since grade 6 and from that moment I knew my future is Basketball.
    I want to become the best NBA I can become.

    I work hard but it’s inconsistent and there are many factors for that,
    I have failed Math in Grade 9 and 10…I really struggle with Math and have
    tutors but I don’t see a huge improvement and that cost me from not being able to play on the court
    in Grade 9, in Grade 10 I tried out for the team and made Varsity but I couldn’t play cause
    of my Mathematics again..and I’m now in grade 11 and I am lacking experience, my coach doesn’t think I will get the plays and everything…I wan’t to prove him wrong and everyone else that doubts me I just want to become the best player. Also since I’m in Grade 11 and I have one more yr left.how can I approach US D1 schools if I live in Canada?? And since I’m lacking experience but can understand the game very well..here let me describe my game to you.

    I’m very athletic, long and lanky and like to attack the basket and get some dunks in, I’m a very great defender and
    shot blocker, I also have a pretty good midrange game and my catch and shooting is pretty good.
    But I need to work on my left hand and handles and get bigger as well..and I also inconsistent with my mental game..some games I’ll be aggressive…other games I’ll be timid..how can I stop this??

    Anyways, thanks man.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Abdul – thanks for the comment. You need to work harder and stay in the gym. Inconsistency comes because you are not confident in your game. The more you practice and see the improvement in your game, the more you will confident on the court. Play as much basketball in your free time as well to validate your hard work when your practicing on your game. Hope that helps!

      Reply
      • Abdul

        Thank you, also how can I ignore people that mock my dream and tell me I can’t do it??

        Reply
        • Lamar Hull

          Ignore them and work on your game every day. That ignorance from others, can help be a part of your driving passion to succeed. They mock you because they can’t do it. Remember that! No matter if you make it or not, you will be a better person for it and find other successful things to happen in your life because of your consistent dedication for the game of basketball.

          Reply
  62. austin tibbs

    Thank you for the advice about basketball and the efforts its been helping my alot being that im 6’1 and staring my freshman year. I think i wouldnt be as good as i am by practicing if i didnt have inspiration

    Reply
  63. Enny

    Hey my name’s enny and I stay in nz am currently 15 and 5″7 I get discouraged by my parents cos every time I play a game and have the chance to show myself I get nervous and messup. I go to school training everyday I would like to work more but there are really no gyms around the only way I could get a gym is to pay but since my parents are not the richest or kindest I don’t really go I get chances to go to camps but same problems I aspire to make it to the NBA but I am always put down every where I go sometimes I give up but bring myself backup any idea how u can help me thinking of applying for a scholarship but I just don’t think I could make it thisng like this just inspire me to work harder ty so much

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Enny – thanks for the comment. If you go outside and work on your game with just a basketball, what will your parents say? If all you have is a basketball and a dream, why do you have to be at school training or a gym? I understand the weather may not always permit, but be creative in your passion and use what you have. Getting nervous is okay, but if you work on your game tirelessly, eventually that nervousness will turn in to confidence. Don’t let any one stop you from trying with what you have.

      Reply
  64. DC

    I am a pretty good basketball player, my coach recently compared me to lebron because of my great decision making, and my passing. I am also a threat from the 3 point line. I have okay grades, but not as good as I would like them to be. I would like to play for a big time program, and get noticed early. I am constantly working on my craft, and I want to be successful. Do you have any advice for me?

    P.S. I really liked your article, it really inspired me

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Thanks for the comment. Continue to work on your game more and harder than the next player in your region, city, etc. If your not considered the top player in your area, then you still have a lot of work to do. Having that skill set and talent will attract coaches. Don’t listen to comparisons develop your self on and off the court, know who you are by your work ethic, passion and dedication to the game. Play AAU, write coaches, go to camps, etc. When your talent shows up in everything you do related to basketball, community and academics the notice part will follow inevitably.

      Reply
  65. Islam Awad

    Hi Lamar. I am not sure if you will reply to this at all but I want to share this with you anyways. I am 15 years old. Not only am I just barely 5 ft and not very big but I have been cut from the team for my 3rd consecutive time. The last time I played team basketball was in 5th grade in my old school. I dont want to sound cocky but I am very good. I make up for my size wth exceptional ball handling. A nice shot and very good defense and work ethic. During tryouts I give it my all. My first two years trying out (7th and 8th grade) I played better than anyone out there. That is what the other kids said. I showed the coaches my all. I got cut. I was angry and depressed for months after and I still couldnt forget it until now. The kids they picked tried out for fun and they didn’t even want to make it. Some of them kept getting in trouble at school and not showing up to games. Instead of the coach learning that picking those kids was a mistake he picked them again. I was literally the only kid that had a lot of determination and work ethic. I asked my coach why and he honestly had no answer that made sense. A little while later I learned he was biased towards the kids he liked and the ones that were on the select team before(he had a pre selected list on his desk so teh kids he knew played before can play again no matter what). I couldnt be on the select team because I was not in that school district yet. Then came this year. I practiced as hard as I could and I was ready. There was a few other kids trying out for fun and they honestly were not at the level they should have been at for their freshman year basketball.Before the tryouts I had my so called friends making fun of me and telling be that there was no way i would make it and i might as well not tryout. I ignored them believing this was my year. On my first day of tryouts I sprained my foot really badly from one drill. I kept going through even though I could not walk. My mom told me to not tryout because I am risking further injury but I told her that I just cant give up. I told her this was my year. At least I thought. I gave it my all but in the end my injury held me back from performing at my max level. I got cut again. I hoped the coach would at least take me for my work ethic but no. He told me that he was sorry but it looked to him like I started playing a couple years ago and other things that made my heart crumble. I wanted to tell him that I’ve been playing my whole life and I have dreamed of playing in the NBA since I was a little boy but I couldnt. I went out and did what anyone would do. I cried and cried and cried. What hurt me even more was that the kids that made it were the kids that really started playing like a month ago and they were the ones making fun of me. They had no experience whatsoever and even this season they are not trying at all like I would. They are not playing well and all they do is mess around. I cant tell them that because they have the team jersey on their side. Now everyday I come home i get a text from one of them asking me if I am going to practie to piss me off or making fun of me and telling me I suck and I sould just kill myself. I cant handle it. This was my year. I gave it all. I have the skills and motivation to be something. But every single time I get put down. My dreams are crumbling and I just cant do it anymore. I dont even think I’ll have a chance to make it next year because they probably have that preselected list thing again I would have given it my all if I had the chance. If only they could take me for who I really am. If only they knew how good I was but now I am losing all interest in anything. Please help me.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Thanks for the comment. I hear your story and am not sure what advice I could give you because I’m not in your environment and don’t know truly what the issue is without seeing what is truly happening. Not saying you are not providing all of the information, but whether I had 3 sides of the story I have to visually see what is accurate. My only advice is think about Jordan, he was cut from his varsity team, I was cut from the team as a college freshman, read this article as well: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2208503-big-time-athletes-who-got-cut-from-teams/. What you will notice, all these professional athletes, was told the same, had some of the same poor experiences, but guess what, they didn’t give up. They found ways and i’m sure there are some positive influences in your life. Let your work ethic speak louder than your frustration. Whether you make the team or not, build something in yourself from your frustration, failures, determination, work-ethic, to become a better person for future success in life.

      Reply
  66. Connor

    I have a question on basketball camps.. I’m 13 right now and next year I’m going to be in high school.. So What kind of places can I go to that would be good for me. Basketball camp rise..

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Where are you located? I would say start with basketball camps in your local area. Go to basketball camps that are hosted by Colleges/Universities in your area. There are also a ton of youth basketball programs that have camps all over the US and I’m sure there are some in your local area. Go to google, search for “basketball camps location”. So for example. “basketball camps los angeles california”.

      Reply
  67. Omar Ehab

    Hey man I’m 14 years old and I started playing basketball 2 years ago after my parents finally got convinced that swimming wasn’t for me, I have been stuck with the sport for 6 or more years but finally I got the chance to play the sport I love, basketball. So I spent 4 months just training in my club without making the team then I managed to join a n average team and now I’m the best player on the team and I would like to take the next step because I’m nowhere near ready for high level basketball and I will definitely try my best. The problem is I’m in Egypt so basketball is not a famous sport and if I wanted to practice on my own I’d probably have to go somewhere far. Anyway I hope you read this and give me some advice.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Omar – excited you get to follow your dreams. I’m not familiar with Egypt basketball, so don’t have much advice for you, but talk with those who you can find connections with online or in your immediate area that can help guide you. Good luck!

      Reply
  68. Omar Ehab

    Oh btw I’m about 5’9 or 5’10 and I play SG SF and PF in case that matters.

    Reply
  69. Jullian Newman

    can I make it to nba with 26.7 points per game and 15.5 rebound, 20.9 assist a game.

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Jullian – thanks for the comment. That’s not up to me. That’s up to you! Keep working hard, keep performing and getting noticed by college coaches. Take one step at a time, be obsessed with improvement no matter your stats!

      Reply
  70. Archelaus Yazzie

    Can I make it to the nba with 30 points,11 rebounds, and 16 assists

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Archelaus – thanks for the comment. That’s not up to me. That’s up to you! I will tell you the same thing I stated to Jullian in the comments. Keep working hard, keep performing and getting noticed by college coaches. Take one step at a time, be obsessed with improvement no matter your stats!

      Reply
  71. Jackson Quentin

    Im 6 foot nine and in eighth grade, will be 7 feet by sophomore year. what are the odds of me making the nba?

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Thanks for the comment Jackson! Pretty tall man for your age. Odds are odds, work on your game and continue to improve!

      Reply
  72. Classified

    Hello i am 11 years old and average 20 points a game 9 rebounds and 10 assists. Can you give me a percentage of how likely I will make the NBA. P.S I am only4’11

    Reply
    • Lamar Hull

      Don’t worry about the percentages. Focus on getting better every day, statistics are based on numbers if you surround your life around that, you are missing the point. NBA players are not born, they work on their game tirelessly! Everyone can’t make it, but give your best effort at trying!

      Reply
      • Tyrone

        I play Basketball at highschool and I am short and I made varsity freshmen year. I am 5’7 and I have crossed so many kids. Do you think I could make it to the NBA in the future if I keep working hard.

        Reply
        • Lamar Hull

          Thanks for the comment Tyrone. It isn’t up to my opinion, it is up to your work ethic and your willingness to take no for an answer. No one can tell you that you can or can not make it to the NBA based on stats or circumstances, just grind everyday every chance you can get and who knows what can happen.

          Reply

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